Mold in the air ducts can be an easy DIY fix. First, turn OFF your HVAC system. Find an approved cleaning solution. Pour or spray the solution on the infected area. Put on protective gear and a mask - you do not want to make contact with the mold (or chemicals! or breathe it in. Scrub the area using disposable towels or brushes, and be sure to check the drip pan and evaporator coils. Vacuum the affected areas after cleaning. Bag all your rags and utensils and dispose of properly. Apply an inhibitor to the affected areas to prevent future growth. It is recommended to call a professional if you have more than 10 square feet of mold as this may be too big of a job, or there might be other/larger issues. Even if you don’t have more than 10 square feet of mold, you can still call a professional to clean it up.
Locally we service the cities of Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Atlantic Beach, Neptune Beach, Orange Park, Fleming Island, Green Cove Springs, Keystone Heights, Penny Farms, St. Augustine, St. Augustine Beach, Ponte Vedra Beach, Nocatee, Hastings, Fernandina Beach, Callahan, and Hillard all located within the counties of Clay, Duval, Nassua, and St. Johns. Call for Free Estimates at (904) 245-1594
I was very pleased with the service provided by Jeff. He was very professional, communicated with me very promptly when scheduling and prior to arriving for the appointment and arrived exactly as scheduled. He worked very efficiently and explained everything to me during the process. My laundry room was left spotless after he completed the job. Jax Vents offered the best price of several vendors that I contacted prior to hiring them. I would very strongly recommend Jax Vents for dryer vent cleaning and plan to have them return when the vent needs cleaning again.
While a thorough air duct cleaning process must be done by professionally qualified service companies, there are a few steps you can take to help maintain the cleanliness of your heating and air conditioning system. One is to change your air filters regularly and make sure you have the right filters for your home and HVAC system. You should also have your system professionally inspected every one to two years to have a technician determine if your air ducts need to be cleaned. In between scheduled maintenance or inspections, you can do a visual check yourself by removing a wall or floor register and shining a flashlight inside the duct. If you can see debris, dirt or dust, it’s time to have your ducts cleaned by a licensed, insured HVAC professional.
The most important reason to keep air ducts clean is your health! Particularly if you have allergies, sensitivities, or respiratory issues, it’s important to keep the air quality high--not to mention potentially dangerous molds from building up. It’s also important for the health of your HVAC system. Keeping it clean and well maintained will improve performance and the life expectancy of the HVAC unit.
"Our electric bill has dropped around seventy dollars a month and that is with the a/c set at 76 degrees. I know it will be lower next summer since I am now taking advantage of the energy start setting the thermostat has. Also our son's coughing at night has stopped and I think it is due in part to the clean air effects filtration system that we got when we purchased the system. We are very happy with our new A/C system. Also we got a refund from Clay electric for having a 17 SEER system and we will get to write some off on our taxed next year."
A. First of all, be sure to be there when they do the job! We had our ducts cleaned and got robbed by one of the workers who thought we wouldn't miss a few "minor" personal items. But, even though they didn't believe us at first, we reported it to the police and the company and he got caught! Secondly, ask if they not only remove the vent covers but clean those too. Ask how they clean them and if they use their own cleaning supplies and take the vent covers outside to clean--not in your bathroom or kitchen sinks, using your personal towels. Ask if they clean up the lint that falls into the room with a vacuum cleaner. They should have a crew of at least two people to put the hose in and clean out the vents and one to clean the vent covers and the area around the vents where the lint falls. They should clean the air intake vents and cover also. Some try to sell you on cleaning out your actual AC/HVAC unit coils. I don't see the need for that, but if they insists it is needed, get them to show you the dirt in there that they will be cleaning out. If they can't show you, chances are they will not be able to get in there to clean it. They should change the air filter, but be sure they don't try to sell you some heavy-duty, life-time guarantee filter that supposedly never needs to be replaced. Those don't let enough air flow through. The medium grade ones changed every few months or so work the best. You can buy those at a home improvement store and change them out yourself during the year. Make sure that they don't damage your walls with their big machine, trying to get it down the hall and around corners. They damaged our walls, too and we had to have them plaster and paint it again. Just because the company has a nationally recognizeable name doesn't mean they will do the best job. Often these are owners who hire flunkies to do the work who are thieves and don't care. It would be better to get a local guy that has been doing it a long time and can furnish you with references of satisfied customers.
There is some disagreement within the industry about the best method for cleaning air ducts.  The two schools of thought are the “negative air” approach and the rotary brush and vacuum approach.  We believe that both air duct cleaning methods can achieve great results in most situations when performed properly by competent technicians.  However, our focus has always been on high quality residential service.  The type of residential duct work commonly used in homes in the South poses unique challenges to duct cleaners because it is soft, flexible, and does not go in straight lines.  Firms using the negative air approach are especially challenged by this type of duct work, as that process was originally designed to work well on the rigid metal duct work commonly found in the North and in large commercial buildings.  The tools used to agitate the duct work in negative air cleaning are very difficult to get all the way into your duct work and can damage the lining of the ducts we find in most residences in the greater Jacksonville area.
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